Reason number 8 as to why the KISSOSA AGM on 29th December

Reason number 8 as to why the KISSOSA AGM on 29th December is a must attend for all (LONG BUT WORTH READING)
Bad memories turned success futures – Intensives deep history
Look back at your time at Intensive and imagine had you not been at Intensive, would you be this successful?
Or, look back and see how Intensive contributed to your future. I will acknowledge that not all of our success can be attributed to the school but we all know how school – not even family – is the biggest socializing agent.
Now back to the challenging things that made our lives feel like hell or complicated. Intensive as is has evolved – the culture and identity has remained intact.
The pioneers of the school, the first students of the school have exciting memories. I am reproducing the first article written by the then Deputy Director – now Managing Director, Mr Asiimwe Gilbert about the history of the school.
Below is an excerpt from the KISMAG 2014 EDITION
First term opened on 4th February, 2002 and that was our official opening day.We decided to start with two classes S.1 and S.2. The memory of that day is still vivid in my mind. Out of the 6 students registered in S.2, only 1 turned up. He was called Malick. Out of the four students we had booked for S.1, three turned up. These were Akim Amisi, Wanok Simon and Kahwa Julius. So on the first day, we had four students. We were brave to start teaching them on the first day up to 5pm. As the students were going home Maxwell and the Senior Woman Teacher, Tino Rose and one supporter Mr. Shaban Byenkya took a photo in memory of the day. The number of students by the end of the week was 10. Meanwhile, information started to move around that we were extremely serious. To attest to this, much as we needed students, those who came for registration shabbily dressed were told to go back home and dress appropriately. KassimHabib who would later studied to become a medical Doctor, was turned away from regis-tration on the first day because he had not combed his hair. But good enough he came back the following day. In the second week, PLE results were released and with information already spreading how serious the school stake holders and parents, we were able register about 110 S.1s. The number of S.2s transferring from other schools also grew. Encouraged by the turn up, we decided to open S.5 in a typical case of one biting more than they could chew. We were forced to suspend the ‘A’ level section until 2005, mainly due to limited resources and the nature of the students. By the end of the year we had about 115 students. This became another challenge because we had limited capacity to handle the number.
We taught our students with unequalled zeal. We counseled them that schools were not about buildings but what one was receiving. Afterall, when you complete your cycle you do not carry the buildings to your home. What mattered and indeed what matters up to now is what one achieves in and outside class. Unfortunately our modern society with its characteristic showi-ness, glorifies the beauty of buildings to attract students as if these also deliver lessons. Schools are now being constructed as if they were palaces and there are countless owners suffering under the burden of multiple loans simply because they want to put up palatial schools. There is not any one who has ever got employment because they studied in beautiful buildings! Our structures have remained simple todate in tandem with our humble beginnings and philosophy. Tribute to the former students and parents,
I want to send special appreciation to our pio-neer students for being good listeners and taking pride in their school. I thank Tumusiime Denis and one Hadijja, for they wore the Intensive uni-form first time as models. Parents too, some of whom have since passed on and those living we owe you gratitude. There were so many sources of discouragement as is always the case when
a new order is being created but you ignored. Students followed school rules strictly and they would even report their colleagues who broke rules in one way or another while going home. The next morning an assembly would be called and the culprits punished. They endured all the problems and strove regardless. I have met on many occasions the pioneer OBS and OGS and they furiously despise the current crop of students for their laziness and fragrant abuse of school rules. No wonder most of them are now successful people. From this evolved what we called Intensive Culture. I virtually knew all the pioneer students and their parents and such was the close relationship we had with these students.
By the end of 2003 the number grew to 156 and by 2004, we were in two hundreds. Our real break through in terms of numbers came in 2005 after we had successfully produced good results in the previous year’s UCE exams. Without a centre of our own we took our students to sit at Atapara SS in the current Oyam District. The performance was splen-did. We produced the best candidate in the region with aggregate 11 for eight. 7 students scored first grade, 16 were in second and only 4 were in third. We have never passed students to that extent. This could only be known locally be-cause were sitting under a foreign centre. And you wouldn’t advertise freely lest the school rejects your students the fol-lowing year.
The following year the number grew to 400 students present-ing new challenges. In the next edition, I will tackle what happened thereafter up to the present. Such were our hum-ble beginnings from which I wish the current students and our general KISMAG readership drew lessons. ENDS. Tomorrow, I will bring you part two of our history. You can access all copies of our magazines here: http://kigumbaintensivesec.ac.ug/intensive-magazine/
What lessons do we learn from here?
#29thDecember #IwillBeThere #ProudIntensivian

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